Can I Do It? (Part 8)

Can I Do It? (Part 8)

Finally the issue of doing “it” has to rest solely at the feet of eternity.  Whether by divine presence or by the unbiased passing of time, we are all judged.  Our “works” (or “its”) in this world will be judged, brought to light, examined. 

Do they pass the test of time?  Are they regarded as useful?  Does our story inspire future generations?  Or, is our desire to leave a legacy actually part of the problem?  Can we write the script for our examiners?  What is ours to manage?

One concerned only about leaving the best legacy will forget the harrowing reality of his or her own limitations.  We can’t write whatever story we want.  We have to write our story.  We have to live our life.  We have to be in our context. 

Can I Do It? (Part 7)

Can I Do It? (Part 7)

Finally, there is the question of what is “it” for?  What will our “it” accomplish?  What story will it tell?  How will it inspire future generations?  How will it ultimately remind people that there is more to life?  How will it work?

Of course the artisans of the world may not bother themselves with such questions.  They may be so focused on their skills that such deliberations are a distraction.  They are doers.  Engineers, not necessarily producers. 

But there are those who possess the ability to see a new reality before anyone else.  Some have the skills needed to bring that vision to life themselves.  Others require the help and collaboration of others.  True visionaries find a way.

They turn their heavenly or invisible reality into a physical one.  But do be sure it starts inside them.  In this sense, they join the very song of creation, where the Poet perfectly draws one letter in front of the other in perfect, magical harmony.

Can I Do It? (Part 6)

Can I Do It? (Part 6)

There can be no “it” without risk.  Any great thing we do must have risk involved.  And even the very concept of risk (especially of failure) is itself an assurance that we are considering something worthy of a child of God.

In other words our ultimate nature must come to bear on this discussion.  Who are we really?  If we are merely temporary creatures here only for a blink in time to somehow serve a future we can never participate in then life almost seems cruel. 

We are cogs in the machine, here only to serve a system.  We have no ultimate meaning or purpose outside of that temporary function.  OR, really are eternal.  We are not done at the ceasing of our breath, we merely transfer to another dimension.

Can I Do It? (Part 5)

Can I Do It? (Part 5)

Now we focus on the question: What is “it”?  What are the things in life that rise to the level of an “it” that we pursue?  Tucked into that answer is great insight into what “it” is in the first place and why it must rise to the level of pursuit. 

Humans are wired to compete.  When told that we can not do something, part of us wants to defy that reality (or mere opinion).  We want to show to others or “prove” to them that we are capable, that we DO have what it takes.  

Some of the greatest feats of human history have been done out of a sense of “I will show you.”  Someone was told they couldn’t so they did, almost simply to spite the idea they could not.  That may seem like playground “dare” mentality.

Can I Do It? (Part 4)

Can I Do It? (Part 4)

Power.  It is incredibly important.  It is the currency of entrepreneurism.  When we have it (or perceive that we have it), we can move mountains.  When we don’t have it (or perceive we can not), we can hardly move out of our own beds. 

Power is not a “super”-power.  It is not invincibility.  It is not limitlessness.  It is not the ability to do whatever we want.  It is simply the internal permission to try.  It is the mind and the heart giving clearance to the will to make a way. 

That’s the great irony of power.  It is exists independent of circumstance.  It is completely internal.   No one can give it to you, no one can take it away.  Only you are given the authority to your own power.  Only you have the key.

Can I Do It? (Part 3)

Can I Do It? (Part 3)

We have to face a breaking point.  That is the truth.  We have to face a huge abyss where there is nothing but nothing.  We stare at the darkness and call out but only a distant echo of our voice is heard.  Our dream will lead us to this.

The good news is that the dawning of every great idea or personal story had to come to this breaking point.  It has to come to a point of utter exhaustion, overwhelming doubt, and chronic confusion.  What do we do next?  How will this work?

These questions reverberate in the void.  At those breaking moments they come back completely unanswered.  We get and got nothing.  Our willingness to go for it and invest into a future reality has led us to no return and perhaps only a loss.

Can I Do It? (Part 2)

Can I Do It? (Part 2)

Can I do it?  A fundamental question of humankind.  Yet almost erroneous from the start.  The subject and focus of the question is us (the “I”).  Can I do it?  It assumes sort of an isolated go at the whole thing where we bear all responsibility. 

And in today’s corporate understanding of responsibility there is the loaded word “accountability.”  People are held responsible to produce certain results or be let go.  Trying is not enough.  Outcomes demand results, not logged office hours.

But ownership is a good thing.  Certainly.  We want people to “own” their endeavors.  Yes.  But what most people mean by that is make sure it works, or succeeds.  Hence the hubris and the fear mongering.  Can we really know what will work?…